Thursday, 29 December 2011

THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS BY VANESSA DIFFENBAUGH - GUEST REVIEW BY ENA



BLURB from Goodreads

A mesmerizing, moving, and elegantly written debut novel, The Language of Flowers beautifully weaves past and present, creating a vivid portrait of an unforgettable woman whose gift for flowers helps her change the lives of others even as she struggles to overcome her own troubled past.

The Victorian language of flowers was used to convey romantic expressions: honeysuckle for devotion, asters for patience, and red roses for love. But for Victoria Jones, it’s been more useful in communicating grief, mistrust, and solitude. After a childhood spent in the foster-care system, she is unable to get close to anybody, and her only connection to the world is through flowers and their meanings.

Now eighteen and emancipated from the system, Victoria has nowhere to go and sleeps in a public park, where she plants a small garden of her own. Soon a local florist discovers her talents, and Victoria realizes she has a gift for helping others through the flowers she chooses for them. But a mysterious vendor at the flower market has her questioning what’s been missing in her life, and when she’s forced to confront a painful secret from her past, she must decide whether it’s worth risking everything for a second chance at happiness.


REVIEW

I loved the concept of the Victorian language of flowers, and really did enjoy that aspect of the book. The whole which flowers represent what was really interesting and informative.
As for the whole story element of the book I am sad to say I found the pace rather slow, and that spoilt the enjoyment of the book for me. Others may also love the story but it just was not my cup of tea I'm afraid. It sounded so romantic, and promising from the blurb but in my opinion failed to deliver. I have read many of the reviews out and about on this book and lots of people seem to have really enjoyed it so, don't let me put you off giving it a go.

Available from Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk £7.01 hardback, £5.24 paperback, £4.39

No comments:

Post a comment